DVD & Blu-Ray Reviews

The Blue Lamp

The Blue Lamp

One of Ealing Studios' darker flicks, Basil Dearden's BAFTA winning The Blue Lamp still shines brightly 66 years on.
The Shallows

The Shallows

While a noble attempt at an enclosed space thriller, shark in the water drama The Shallows lacks claustrophobia and bite.
The Royal Tenenbaums

The Royal Tenenbaums

Wes Anderson's first masterpiece and one of the most whimsical American dramedies since Harold and Maude, The Royal Tenenbaums is a wonderfully warming picture.
The Squid and the Whale

The Squid and the Whale

A career best performance from Jeff Daniels is enough to draw you in but it's writer/director Noah Baumbach's insight into fractured families that has true staying power.
Assault on Precinct 13

Assault on Precinct 13

Cheap, nasty and absolutely brilliant, John Carpenter's 1976 siege classic Assault on Precinct 13 holds up to this day.
Jinnah

Jinnah

You've never seen Christopher Lee like this before. Jinnah is an important film in itself but a revelation for Lee and his Hammer Horror fans.
The Hired Hand

The Hired Hand

An enigmatic western from a rare era of deeply personal filmmaking, Peter Fonda's The Hired Hand is one of cinema's true shooting stars.
The Beatles: Eight Days A Week - The Touring Years

The Beatles: Eight Days A Week - The Touring Years

The infectious energy of the Fab Four is captured wonderfully in the first officially licensed feature-length Beatles documentary.
Akira Kurosawa's Dreams

Akira Kurosawa's Dreams

As dreamlike as its title would suggest, this is Akira Kurosawa opening his beautiful mind to the viewer without the filter and dilution of a conventional narrative. A film that instils genuine wonder.
Punch-Drunk Love

Punch-Drunk Love

Adam Sandler goes dramatic for the first time in Paul Thomas Anderson's slow burning romance Punch-Drunk Love.
To Live and Die in LA

To Live and Die in LA

A 100% proof indictment that thrillers can swagger, William Friedkin's To Live and Die in LA is one of the defining action pictures of the 1980s.
Better Call Saul: Season Two

Better Call Saul: Season Two

By taking its sweet time to blossom into the Breaking Bad prequel you expected, Better Call Saul has developed its own power, tone and justification.
Jamaica Inn (1939)

Jamaica Inn (1939)

Moments of cinematic brilliance (which look wonderful on Arrow's Blu-ray) anchor Alfred Hitchcock's otherwise floaty costume melodrama Jamaica Inn.
Twilight's Last Gleaming

Twilight's Last Gleaming

A starry cast and an engaging use of split-screen work add fire to Robert Aldrich's 'man on the nuclear button' doomsday thriller Twilight's Last Gleaming.
Two Women

Two Women

A fresh take on the war genre that switches battlefield explosions for society's implosions, Vittorio De Sica's Two Women is a smart, enduring masterpiece.
A Special Day

A Special Day

Director Ettore Scola brings compassion to a powerful, beguiling narrative that gives Italian greats Loren and Mastroianni plenty of room to shine like the genuine stars they are.
The Angry Birds Movie

The Angry Birds Movie

Capturing the fun and frustration of the runaway smash mobile game, The Angry Birds Movie falls just shy of its colourful target.
The Man Who Fell to Earth (40th Anniversary)

The Man Who Fell to Earth (40th Anniversary)

Less of an exploration of David Bowie's titular alien, Roeg's often misunderstood sci-fi classic is a harsh, stylised condemnation of Earth's own far from welcoming people who ply the E.T. with our vices to capture his secrets. Incredible.
Aloys

Aloys

As if Wes Anderson directed The Conversation, Tobias Nölle's quirky detective dramedy Aloys overflows with heart and originality.
The Neon Demon

The Neon Demon

The most mesmerising film of the year, The Neon Demon is as vibrant and as haunting as its title would suggest and with it Nicolas Winding Refn takes the crown as this generation's David Lynch.

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