DVD & Blu-Ray Reviews

The Mechanic

The Mechanic

Perfectly watchable big screen entertainment sold by its action scenes but given a touch of acting class by Jason Statham and Donald Sutherland.
Treme Season One

Treme Season One

'Treme' knows when to let the music do the talking, but you'll be just as transfixed to hear these post-Hurricane Katrina dwellers interact with each other via a script touches on Robert Altman for off-centre ensemble brilliance.
L'Age D'Or

L'Age D'Or

At times incredibly dated, at others still pushing the envelope with wild fearlessness, Dali and Bunuel's 'L'Age D'Or' is a daring social comedy bolstered by bold style.
The Burmese Harp

The Burmese Harp

Another classic of Japanese cinema championed by the Masters of Cinema, 'The Burmese Harp' is an understated, detailed anti-war drama that flies so far below the radar it borders on mystical.
Just Go With It

Just Go With It

'Just Go With It' is immature to the extreme, led astray by unlikely coincidences of plot and frankly stupid characters. What else do you expect from Adam Sandler?
Stanley Kubrick: Visionary Filmmaker Collection

Stanley Kubrick: Visionary Filmmaker Collection

A fantastic presentation of the seminal filmmaker's work for Warner Brothers, this Blu-ray set is an absolute must.
The Bird With The Crystal Plumage

The Bird With The Crystal Plumage

40 years haven't been kind to Dario Argento's groundbreaking 'giallo' picture, but it remains an immensely stylish, well made, pleasure-filled murder mystery.
Junebug

Junebug

A quiet, understated drama boasting a lively, winning performance from Amy Adams, 'Junebug' rewards viewers for searching beneath the surface of stilted family interactions.
Tigerland

Tigerland

Colin Farrell aces one of cinema's greatest breakout roles in 'Tigerland' – a boot camp war film blistering with private battles.
Alice

Alice

A dark, jarring mix of a live action Alice and a stop-motion Wonderland, Jan Svankmajer racks up the torment and takes no prisoners.
Love and Other Drugs

Love and Other Drugs

Even ill-advised shifts in tone from terminal illness drama to frat boy comedy can't extinguish Anne Hathaway's fiery performance in Edward Zwick's promising, but underwhelming, 'Love and Other Drugs'.
The Hustler

The Hustler

A stark examination of compulsive gambling, alcoholism and raw talent, 'The Hustler' boasts exemplary acting from Paul Newman, George C Scott and Jackie Gleason. And some great pool playing.
Spartacus: Blood and Sand

Spartacus: Blood and Sand

'Spartacus: Blood and Sand' may be overly stylised sword and sandal romping that gets by on lashings of sex and violence, but there's enough audacity and excitement here to fill arenas.
The Walking Dead (Season One)

The Walking Dead (Season One)

Stephen King adaptation favourite Frank Darabont (director and screenwriter of 'The Shawshank Redemption', 'The Green Mile' and 'The Mist') is the perfect man to helm this 'The Stand' inspired epidemic aftermath horror series.
Fortress

Fortress

Distractingly bad music and soap opera acting quality don't do 'Fortress' any favours, but its plot of a teacher and her young students fleeing armed kidnappers and 'going native' into the Australian outback has legs.
Biutiful

Biutiful

A relentlessly bleak search for light in the darkest of human suffering, Alejandro González Iñárritu's 'Biutiful' is redeemed by Javier Bardem's incredible acting.
The Next Three Days

The Next Three Days

After the dust settles, Paul Haggis' 'The Next Three Days' is a flawed, good chase caper but one which remains unsure of its own direction despite Russell Crowe's strong performance.
I Saw The Devil

I Saw The Devil

A brutal look into the mind of a serial killer and his grief stricken pursuer, Jee-woon Kim's 'I Saw The Devil' is as engaging as it is repulsive.
Midnight Cowboy

Midnight Cowboy

An essential big city, late night character study that wasn't afraid to get its (then) clean cut stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman career-shatteringly dirty. A true classic.
The King's Speech

The King's Speech

British film finds itself in another 'Chariots of Fire' moment of inspiration with Tom Hooper's 'The King's Speech' - an engaging, easy to watch modern classic worthy of your ears (and eyes), particularly because of Colin Firth's Oscar friendly performance...

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